Dryandra Woodland – revisited – revisited

Yesterday’s post reminded me to look up some information on the small, striped, squirrel-like creatures I saw running around Dryandra. Turns out they’re not Indian palm squirrels that have escaped from Perth zoo. They are, in fact, native animals called numbats. We saw lots of these so-called numbats running around the place, but unfortunately I didn’t get any good photos. Of course, a dodgy photo of a numbat is still pretty good, what with them being the cutest creatures on the face of the planet and so on and so forth. Here, then, are some dodgy numbat photos (meaning the photos are dodgy, not the numbats. I didn’t get to know the numbats well enough to make aspersions about their characters in that manner).

Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus)

Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus)

Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus)
Juvenile numbat

Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus)

Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus)
Juvenile numbats. I sat outside their burrow for about 40 minutes waiting for them to emerge in the morning. Mum came out first, but dashed off before I could take any pics. These two juveniles sat outside their burrow for a while, but the vegetation obscured my view (and that of my camera).

Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus)
Adult male numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus)

About Stewart Macdonald

I'm a wildlife ecologist living and working in Queensland, Australia. I spend most of my time in the bush finding and photographing wildlife.
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