Christmas trip 5 – Brigalow Belt

After Main Range, we headed to the Brigalow Belt. I’ve spent a fair bit of time in the the brigalow belt, so I was unlikely to see much new stuff. There was, however, one species found in the area that had continually eluded me: the woma. I know a number of people who’ve seen them out that way, but I’ve never managed to track one day. We spent a few days in the region, and had quite the surprise on our last night…

Dunmall's snake (Furina dunmalli)
Dunmall’s snake (Furina dunmalli)

Dunmall's snake (Furina dunmalli)
Dunmall’s snake (Furina dunmalli). This photo of it yawning shows a clear crease on its nasal scale.

Brigalow scaly-foot (Paradelma orientalis)
Brigalow scaly-foot (Paradelma orientalis)

Brigalow scaly-foot (Paradelma orientalis)
Brigalow scaly-foot (Paradelma orientalis)

Thick-tailed gecko (Underwoodisaurus milli)
Thick-tailed gecko (Underwoodisaurus milli)

Pale-headed snake (Hoplocephalus bitorquatus)
Pale-headed snake (Hoplocephalus bitorquatus)

Pale-headed snake (Hoplocephalus bitorquatus)
The pale head of a pale-headed snake (Hoplocephalus bitorquatus)

Spotted black snake (Pseudechis guttatus)
Spotted black snake (Pseudechis guttatus)

Spotted black snake (Pseudechis guttatus)
Spotted black snake (Pseudechis guttatus)

Copper-tailed skink (Ctenotus taeniolatus)
Copper-tailed skink (Ctenotus taeniolatus)

Golden-tailed gecko (Strophurus taenicauda taenicauda)
Golden-tailed gecko (Strophurus taenicauda taenicauda)

Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis)
Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis) looking cute and curious.

Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis)
Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis) looking a bit agitated.

Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis)
Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis) looking decidely miffed.

Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis)
Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis) roaring as part of a territorial display.

Eastern robust skink (Ctenotus robustus)
Eastern robust skink (Ctenotus robustus)

Leopard skink (Ctenotus pantherinus)
Leopard skink (Ctenotus pantherinus)

Marbled velvet gecko (Oedura marmorata)
Marbled velvet gecko (Oedura marmorata)

Australian coral snake (Brachyurophis australis)
Australian coral snake (Brachyurophis australis)

Australian coral snake (Brachyurophis australis)
Australian coral snake (Brachyurophis australis). Head in sand.

Eastern beaked gecko (Rhynchoedura ormsbyi)
Eastern beaked gecko (Rhynchoedura ormsbyi)

Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis)
Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis)

Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis)
Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis)

Dwyer's snake (Parasuta dwyeri)
Dwyer’s snake (Parasuta dwyeri)

Eastern bearded dragon (Pogona barbata)
Eastern bearded dragon (Pogona barbata)

Short-footed frog (Cyclorana brevipes)
Short-footed frog (Cyclorana brevipes)

Eastern blue-tongued skink (Tiliqua scincoides scincoides)
Eastern blue-tongued skink (Tiliqua scincoides scincoides)

Grey snake (Hemiaspis damelii)
Grey snake (Hemiaspis damelii)

Unbanded shovel-nosed snake (Brachyurophis incinctus)
Unbanded shovel-nosed snake (Brachyurophis incinctus)

Carpet python (Morelia spilota ssp.)
Carpet python (Morelia spilota ssp.)

Carpet python (Morelia spilota ssp.)
Carpet python (Morelia spilota ssp.). Wide angles make for interesting perspectives. This would be Morelia spilota mcdowelli or Morelia spilota metcalfei. Or both. Or neither.

Black-headed python (Aspidites melanocephalus)
The world’s most disappointing black-headed python (Aspidites melanocephalus). I thought it was a woma at first. It wasn’t. I thought we were a bit far south for black-headed pythons. We weren’t.

About Stewart Macdonald

I'm a wildlife ecologist living and working in Queensland, Australia. I spend most of my time in the bush finding and photographing wildlife.
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3 Responses to Christmas trip 5 – Brigalow Belt

  1. Pingback: Christmas trip 6 – Winton | Stewed Thoughts

  2. John Scanlon says:

    Crikey, what an amazing few days one can have in southern Qld!!

    I don’t think I ever examined any Brachyurophis “incinctus” from anywhere southeast of Mount Isa, and the longitudinal stripes on the pictured specimen are… unusual. J

  3. Annie MacDonald says:

    It Delights me to my core to see all these beautiful creatures still managing to live out their lives in the wild.
    Thank you for all the marvellous photos.. n engaging comments, which really do enhance the whole experience.
    Would it be OK, please, if I copy your photos of these smart skinks to send, privately, to a friend in Alabama, who has snazzy blue-tailed skinks [n other lizards] in her ‘garden’??
    [She makes little video episodes about them, n runs a dog n cat rescue] http://www.youtube.com/watchv=eGjej71vf4s&feature=share&list=UU1dR7E88JXE409yoboy8FDQ
    I didn’t get any emails from Stewed Thoughts since April n was concerned.. I’m so glad All’s Well.. n will be catching up.
    All the Best. Cheers, Annie [Apple? :)) ]